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Sunday, November 24, 2019

Seoul, at Myeongdong Night Time


In the early evening when the Myeongdong streets get closed to vehicles traffic, the food stalls start to arrive serving various kind of Korean dishes. As the neon lights lit up the smoke from the grills raised to the air spreading mouth watering smell. You can walk from stall to stall finding foods judging from the appearance and the smell.  

But unlike in Bangkok where you can eat entire meals on the sidewalk, in Seoul the street food are more along snack kind of food, things that can be eaten standing up or walking, catering to Seoul people that are walking from subway to subway. 

In the dense grid of streets in Myeongdong, the food stalls lined-up in the middle of hotels, skin care shops, restaurants, cafés and night clubs. It is the hot spot of Seoul for tourists. From stalls to stalls, you can hunt for foods, but you must try first the Tteokbokki, a rice cake with fish, egg, scallion and a sweet and spicy red sauce. The firmness of the cake combined with the aroma of scallions and sesame seeds make it a delicious snack on a cool evening. A Tteokbokki serving costs around 2000 to 4000 KRW.

Photo by cutekirin, Wikimedia


Along the rather spicy Tteokbokki, you may accompany it with Gimbap, a sushi like rice rolls, consisting sticky rice – ‘bap’ rolled up inside a seaweed sheet - ‘Gim’, filled with ingredients such as vegetables, tuna, crab stick, pickles and other variety. A serving of 3 to 4 roll slices costs about 1500 KRW.



Photo by cutekirin, Wikimedia
Then you can try Hweori Gamja or tornado potato which is very popular Korean street food. It is a deep fried spiral cut potato, like tornado, which is then dipped in all kinds of toppings. These can include cheese, red pepper, honey or brown sugar. The tornado potato is a nice snack, easy to eat while walking in Myeongdong night market.


Photo by tragrpx, Wikimedia


After eating those “snacks” than you can eat your “main dish” Sundae.  Don’t be mistaken it is not an ice cream, it is a Korean style blood sausage. Although the appearance of the sausage is rather off-putting, it is black, it is surprisingly tasty. It is originated back to the Goryeo period, recorded in 19th century cookbooks and it was initially meant to be served for special occasions. Depending on the vendor, the blood sausage can be stuffed with meat, glass noodles and all kinds of vegetables. A serving can cost about 6000 KRW.

Photo by SauceSupreme, Wikimedia

Now you must be stuffed already,  if not you can try the Ppopgi. This is an old fashioned sugar candy, mostly sold and made by the older Korean generation. This ppopgi candy only has 2 ingredients, baking soda and sugar, but timing and technique are key to making the perfect ppopgi. Each ppopgi has a different shape pattern, back in the days if the kids could eat around the pattern without braking it, they would get a free ppopgi from the vendor. Try it, it is harder than it looks like.


Photo by도자놀자 , Wikimedia


THE END





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